The Public Good

…does not inherently mean our own personal good…

“Happy will it be if our choice should be directed by a judicious estimate of our true interests, unperplexed and unbiased by considerations not connected with the public good. “

~ Alexander Hamilton, The Federalist Papers, No. 1, 27 October, 1787

____________________________________________________________________________

America is selfish.  We’ve become a nation where what defines our politics and our vote is not the idea of what’s best for the nation, but best for ourselves.  We vote for the politicians whose personal beliefs match our own or for those who promise policies which seem advantageous for us.  Whether or not those beliefs and policies are the ones that most match our nation’s core values or are the best ones for the nation as a whole seldom enters into the equation.  We believe we have a right to vote however we please, for whatever we please.

This attitude, this self-centered politicking, is the exact opposite of what the Founding Fathers intended.  It makes an abomination of an act that is supposed to be a civic duty of the highest order.  Our vote was NEVER intended to be about OURSELVES.  Our vote was meant to be cast for our nation, for what will beget the most good for the country as a complete whole.  In fact, the Founders depended on the idea that people would participate for the public good.  In their view, this was absolutely essential to the viability and continuity of our country.  Because when we do anything less, we create policies for a nation of one, instead of a nation of all.  And if we ALL want our nation to have a future, we ALL need to be ALL-IN for the common good.

Res Publica

Documentation without Representation

Alexander Hamilton, The Federalist Papers, No. 1, 27 October, 1787

http://avalon.law.yale.edu/18th_century/fed01.asp

Electronic Text Courtesy of The Avalon Project at Yale Law School

Leave a Comment ↓

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: